Who are the English and where does the word “English” come from – its not from the Angles!

The ancient inhabitants of England were known as Lloegrwys, and the country was Lloegres  (as they still are in the Welsh language.)  This would imply that these people were Moon worshippers, from the words “lloer” meaning the Moon, and “lloergan” for Moonlight, and “lloerog” which is “like the moon”.  The people of ancient southern Babylonian Ur were moon worshippers.

The great temple and ziggurat of the Moon god Nannar dominated the ancient city of Ur. and Nannar son nfBel-Enlil and his wife Nin-gal the Moon goddess were the patron deities of the city. Small beginnings but still a beginning.

Looking at the Language of the Lloegrwys, nothing is quite as it appears. The Welsh Histories state under the date AD 826, –“The Language which prevailed in Lloegres was the language of the Icinglas.”

In the context in which this appears it means that out of Old British = Khumric, Latin, German, Angle and Saxon and Danish, the language which remained native to Lloegres was the language of the Iceni tribal nation. The Iceni are perhaps best remembered through their Queen Boudicca who rose against the barbarian Roman invaders in the time of Nero, and slaughtered many thousands of them, and her statue stands outside the palace of Westminster.

At first sight this may appear questionable given the Mind Set implanted in the British education system by nineteenth century demagogues.

If the records preserved from pre-Norman England are, as alleged, Anglo-Saxon, then why is it that no Englishman could ever simply talk with a German?

It appears that the language is not a form of German and therefore it may not be Anglo-Saxon. Many scholars have remarked that the early writers of these alleged Anglo-Saxon texts all had British names, with Caedmon being the best known. The idea that a form of German replaced the native language of Lloegres is an assumption made without analysis, and the politics of the 19th Century within the limits of its own misconceptions tended to favour unctuous stagnation in place of the truth. The early writers were native British and there is no evidence that the migrating Angles and Saxons brought an alphabet with them.

An illustration of this is that there are no extant Continental copies of the Beowulf saga.

 

This brought light to another curiosity. In the Mid 1970’s three writers named Michael Baigent, Richard Leigh, and Henry Lincoln, wrote a book speculating on the possible settlement of a Jewish Christian community in Southern France in the First Century AD. Later they continued their individual researches and publications and one wrote of a Frenchman who researched the origins of the English Language and came up with the answer that English derived from ancient Chaldean. And of course the Frenchman either could not or would not state why this was so. This line of research is interesting as it points to the Albyne migration from ancient Chaldea. It may not be a popular line of enquiry to follow in a British University, but it remains fairly obvious that the English language never seems to have been Germanic.

The Khumric British histories may well be right about the ancient Language of Lloegres.

The most widely published is that in the historical records attributed to the William of Malmesbury, and was published by EK Chambers of Cambridge in 1922 under -From interpolations (12th – 13th cent) in De Antiquitate Glastoniensis Ecclesiae (I 129 – 39) edited by I.Hearne with Historia of Adam ofDomerham. (1727)

” ……. quod mala mali illius Ealdcyrcenas eppel, i veteris ecclesiae poma, vocantur; sus quoque Ealdecyrce suge idciro nominabatur, ….. “

Now Ealde-Cyrcenas means simply the “Old Syrians”, and here we have writers of around over 800 years ago informing us of these Old Syrians in Britain. The entire text actually places these Old Syrians right into the middle of England.

What we know as the County of Surrey may well be old Sirrye or old Syria, and no one has been looking.

Also there there are the pre-Christian era coins of Britain, which are inscribed. The lettering on these coins does appear to be in a form of the British Coelbren Alphabet, which would generally relate to Western Britain and to the Khumric people of the Brutus migration around 504 BC.  They pre-date the Anglo-Saxons by at least 500 years and by probably much more.

It seems that scholars have been beguiled into thinking that old English texts are “Anglo-Saxon” and no attempt has been made to interpret these coins as inscribed in the same language 500 years before the arrival of these Saxons and Angles albeit, and much of the evidence is diaphanous.

In their efforts to promote Anglo-Saxonism in the 19th Century, Edwin Guest and Bishop Stubbs were also demolishing the ancient history of Lloegres – England. The idea, which they created, was that the Welsh, the Irish, and even the Scots, were earlier barbarians peoples who were conquered by the much later English in the persons of the Angles and Saxons. Yet the histories place the Lloegres -Icinglas – the earlies English people, as the first in Britain by at least 1000 years.

If Albyne arrived around 1600 BC and Brutus around 504 BC, this is so. Yet the highly advanced civilization of the Eadie Cyrcenas from Syria has proved them to be the most enduring of people.

This then brings matters to what archaeologists have designated as the “Wessex” Culture which would imply “West Saxons”, in spite of the fact that the “Wessex” Culture was an amazing metal working civilization which suddenly erupted out of nowhere all across the Southern half of Britain around 1600 BC, some 2000 years before any Saxon arrival in Britain.

Every aspect of this extraordinary new culture points to an inward immigration from an existing high-level civilization, which is precisely what the British histories record in the Albyne Story.

The reason for a major fleet sailing to Britain from Chaldean-Syria around 1600 BC is obviously related to Britain being the Tin Island. This was the dawn of the Bronze Age with the much harder Bronze weapons being far superior to the earlier softer copper weapons and tools. Tin was the essential ingredient required

to smelt soft copper into hard bronze, and tin was in scarce supply. A plan by the major imperial power in the ancient world to seize control of the Tin Island would seem to be a very logical step. There would appear to be no other explanation for the sudden bursting forth of the remarkable “Wessex” Culture across southern Britain.

 

This brought light to another curiosity. In the Mid 1970’s three writers named Michael Baigent, Richard Leigh, and Henry Lincoln, wrote a book speculating on the possible settlement of a Jewish Christian community in Southern France in the First Century AD. Later they continued their individual researches and publications and one wrote of a Frenchman who researched the origins of the English Language and came up with the answer that English derived from ancient Chaldean. And of course the Frenchman either could not or would not state why this was so. This line of research is interesting as it points to the Albyne migration from ancient Chaldea. It may not be a popular line of enquiry to follow in a British University, but it remains fairly obvious that the English language never seems to have been Germanic.

The Khumric British histories may well be right about the ancient Language of Lloegres.

The most widely published is that in the historical records attributed to the William of Malmesbury, and was published by EK Chambers of Cambridge in 1922 under -From interpolations (12th – 13th cent) in De Antiquitate Glastoniensis Ecclesiae (I 129 – 39) edited by I.Hearne with Historia of Adam ofDomerham. (1727).

” ……. quod mala mali illius Ealdcyrcenas eppel, i veteris ecclesiae poma, vocantur; sus quoque Ealdecyrce suge idciro nominabatur, ….. “

Now Ealde-Cyrcenas means simply the “Old Syrians”, and here we have writers of around over 800 years ago informing us of these Old Syrians in Britain. The entire text actually places these Old Syrians right into the middle of England.

What we know as the County of Surrey may well be old Sirrye or old Syria, and no one has been looking.
Also there there are the pre-Christian era coins of Britain, which are inscribed. The lettering on these coins does appear to be in a form of the British Coelbren Alphabet, which would generally relate to Western Britain and to the Khumric people of the Brutus migration around 504 BC.  They pre-date the Anglo-Saxons by at least 500 years and by probably much more.

It seems that scholars have been beguiled into thinking that old English texts are “Anglo-Saxon” and no attempt has been made to interpret these coins as inscribed in the same language 500 years before the arrival of these Saxons and Angles albeit, and much of the evidence is diaphanous.

In their efforts to promote Anglo-Saxonism in the 19th Century, Edwin Guest and Bishop Stubbs were also demolishing the ancient history of Lloegres – England. The idea, which they created, was that the Welsh, the Irish, and even the Scots, were earlier barbarians peoples who were conquered by the much later English in the persons of the Angles and Saxons. Yet the histories place the Lloegres -Icinglas – the earlies English people, as the first in Britain by at least 1000 years.

If Albyne arrived around 1600 BC and Brutus around 504 BC, this is so. Yet the highly advanced civilization of the Eadie Cyrcenas from Syria has proved them to be the most enduring of people.

This then brings matters to what archaeologists have designated as the “Wessex” Culture which would imply “West Saxons”, in spite of the fact that the “Wessex” Culture was an amazing metal working civilization which suddenly erupted out of nowhere all across the Southern half of Britain around 1600 BC, some 2000

years before any Saxon arrival in Britain.

Every aspect of this extraordinary new culture points to an inward immigration from an existing high-level civilization, which is precisely what the British histories record in the Albyne Story.

The reason for a major fleet sailing to Britain from Chaldean-Syria around 1600 BC is obviously related to Britain being the Tin Island. This was the dawn of the Bronze Age with the much harder Bronze weapons being far superior to the earlier softer copper weapons and tools. Tin was the essential ingredient required

to smelt soft copper into hard bronze, and tin was in scarce supply. A plan by the major imperial power in the ancient world to seize control of the Tin Island would seem to be a very logical step. There would appear to be no other explanation for the sudden bursting forth of the remarkable “Wessex” Culture across southern Britain.

Extraordinary pieces of fine gold work have sometimes been found in the excavation of large “Wessex” Culture grave mounds, which were obviously raised for important leaders. Only George Bain of Edinburgh realised what might have happened and he began a thorough investigation of the patterns of designs of ancient ornamentation. Ancient jewellery sometimes discovered in Britain yields evidence of common designs.

The ancient stone crosses, churches, and memorial stones, arc mostly embellished with recognizably standard designs, as are coffins.  This can also be seen in ancient manuscripts where the scribes and monks frequently took the first letter on a page -at the left hand top- and embellished that letter with quite extraordinary embroidery of animals and foliages.

George Bain made comparisons in Britain and and he also extended the scope of his research to include the ancient patterns used in embellishing the ancient temples, the palaces, the jewellery, pottery, and other artefacts, of the ancient civilizations of Asia Minor, Chaldea, Assyria. and Greece. Here he found direct correlations between standard design patterns in Britain and Ireland and the ancient nations of the Eastern Mediterranean and Western Asia.  Bain showed that there are clearly ancient connections between Britain and Ireland and these other civilizations from which the British and the Irish trace their ancestry.

The frequent use of squared off waves patterns, of entwined swastika wind symbols, of endless entwined rope designs – which symbolize eternity – and chequer-board maze designs, and other legendary motifs appear in every linked culture.

There are also a limited number of other ancient artefacts that are inscribed with the early alphabet found in England. One is the famous Franks Casket with its carved scenes and short texts, which does not appear to read as currently suggested. Also similarly inscribed is the great stone cross at Ruthwell in Dumfriesshire. Then there is – as will he shown later – the otherwise inexplicable discovery of three “Anglo-Saxon” inscriptions in the Mid-West of the U.S.A.

<The early British/Cymric migrations and journeys to America will be covered in a future article>

This article is an edited extract from Wilson and Blackett’s book – The Trojan War 650BC.

 

22 thoughts on “Who are the English and where does the word “English” come from – its not from the Angles!”

    1. Thank you James and apologies for the slow reply – the notification didnt seem to have come through and I have just realised that I missed a whole raft of comments.
      I have been posting some articles on the new forum and Facebook group and neglecting to put them here as well.
      I will fix that asap and also have some new ones coming soon.
      Please also check out the ‘britainshiddenhistory Ross’ Youtube channel where there are some new videos on similar subjects.

  1. Hi, very nice website, cheers!
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  2. I find the idea that the English language came from the Iceni tribe rather than the Saxons or Angles interesting however, how do modern texts explain that English is part of the Germanic branch of the language tree. What branch should the English language reside on in your opinion?

    1. I don’t know the full reasons that are given to make English a Germanic language and would be interested to learn more about it. There are some Germanic sounding words as would be expected after 1500 years or so of contact. There is even more crossover with Welsh though and presumably old Iceniglas. One explanation given for this is that both Welsh and English have some “latin” roots which are attributed to the good old Romans. However, if you look at the migration histories of the British it can be seen that the some of their number ended up in Etrusca and the overlaps are more likely to be due to a shared origin.
      Bunsen wrote as far back as the 1850s that the root of a lot of Indo-European languages goes back to Ancient Syria of around 1700BC and traces can be seen in many languages – such as Sanskrit. He states that Welsh is the nearest to the original due to it being on the edge of Europe and not having been subject to mass migrations – this is why it comes in so handy when translating Egyptian hieroglyphics. Although in recent times Welsh is rapidly changing as can be seen when comparing the language with that found in Welsh dictionaries of the 17th Century. Many of the words shown are only known by older Welsh speakers, if at all, and the Welsh of the BBC and that being taught in schools is very different to the old Welsh of South Wales.
      Another point to bear in mind is that Welsh speakers can converse with Breton speakers – at least those speaking older Welsh such as David Lloyd George famously chatting up the French girls back in his day.
      The same cannot be said of English speakers and German speakers. I speak passable German and the links with English are not obvious and knowing English is not much help trying to speak German.
      The logic for Iceni being a route of English is partly due to there being potentially millions of Iceni speakers and only a few “boatloads” of those speaking Germanic tongues. Newport MP Paul Flynn once famously read from an old text in parliament. Boothroyd was in the speaker’s chair and leapt on him for speaking the banned language of Welsh. He revealed that it was actually originally Chaucer – old English. So she certainly thought it sounded like Welsh!
      It seems to be that the roots of the English language are being made to fit the Germanic narrative than any hard evidence that I am aware of. It would be interesting to see if anyone can add the justification for German.
      Thanks for the interesting question
      Heddwch
      Ross

      1. Hello,

        Thanks for the informative reply. Someone arguing for English being a Germanic language might suggest that, as the English lands were inhabited by the Angles and Saxons it only makes sense that they used their own language throughout the English lands during the centuries up to the Norman invasion. Do you believe that the Saxons and Angles adopted a language other than their own when they initially settled on British lands?

        All the best,

        Ray

        1. Hi Ray,
          Sorry I missed your comment at the time. I didnt receive a notification for some reason. We have since set up a new stand-alone forum which allows other admins and will hopefully make things easier – see post below this one.
          Regards the Anglo-Saxons bringing their own language – the question arises of how many Angles and Saxons actually did come?
          They came by the “boatload” which might not be that many when compared with recent estimates of the British population being 10 million or more. The DNA project carried out in partnership with the BBC about 10 years ago also reported the surprising findings that 70% of ‘English’ people had British DNA. They made a bizarre explanation but the more logical one is that while the borders moved for various reasons, the people might not have done. Did the French suddenly become German when they were invaded in WWII?
          I have found a lot more Welsh roots for supposedly English words and will be writing on this soon and will include it in the blog here that I have been neglecting.
          I hope that I havent been too slow in writing this and that you still see it.
          I promise to be more vigilant for replies and try to get the notification system working!
          Best wishes
          Ross

          1. I also meant to mention that the French didnt start speaking German when the Germans invaded them in WWII and the English only adopted a few words of French-Norman when they arrived.
            Hope that helps
            Heddwch

          2. Hello again,

            I would be interested in viewing the BBC documentary you mentioned. Just to clarify, did the results indicate that the English population was found to be 70% British or 70% were found to have varying amounts of British genes incorporated into their DNA?
            Getting back to the English language, has anyone compared old English with the Saxon language that may have been inscribed on old grave stones etc. of that time and earlier? If no Saxon writings could be found do you think that the Saxon language was identical or similar to the Vandal language and, would there be examples of the Vandal language around the area of Carthage where they stayed for, I think, about 100 years?

            Regards,

            Ray

  3. Margaret Taylor-Hill

    Do you have any further references to George Bain Ross? I am wondering if it could be the same George Bain my late husband used to have in depth discussions with about the Templars and Roslyn Chapel. He was related to the Cockburns I believe.

  4. This is a good post. I have a friend who is convinced Hebrew is rooted to Welsh, which seems more likely than English being like German. I have only undertaken limited research into old, middle and modern English, and there are some links between old english and modern words, such as heorte and heart, drincun and drink, and eald and old. However, I don’t think this is conclusive evidence of English having its root in German, as I am certain if you did a comparative study you will probably find similar sounding words in many languages.

    Perhaps the opposite is true and English is the older language not German. If England is named after the son of Brutus, Locrinus, then old english would potentially be the language of the Trojans and the Hittites before them and the Tribes of Israel before them. But the problem with this is the fact that Brutus was known as the dragon king, and seeing as he landed in Wales, it would logically follow that his root nation inherited his (red) dragon and language. If Welsh has its root in Hebrew, then it would have been inherited from the Tribes of Israel via the Hittites via the Trojans.

    Normally, I would assume that Locrine (Lloegria) and England has its root in the familiar story of a son usurping a father to claim the kingdom, but there’s a little bit more to this story because of the love triangle between Locrinus, Estrildis and Gwendolen. That said, Wales has been a principality beneath England for some time. Is that because Gwendolen took the throne from the Brutus bloodline and installed the Corineus bloodline instead?

    I would have to explore the language further, but if Gwendolen usurped early ‘England’, I wonder if old english is more rooted to ancient Cornish?

    1. Thanks for the interesting discussion points.
      There’s quite a few things tangled together there.
      I think its easier to think of Hebrew and Welsh sharing a common route rather than trying to work out which one is first. The original seems to have been Ancient Assyrian and looking at how heiroglyphics are written (and read) Welsh seems to have remained remarkably unaltered over a few thousand years.
      Hebrew is more complicated as it is a ‘resurrected’ language with no direct succession to its early use. This makes it difficult to confirm exactly how it should be spoken and how the writing really works. Having seen how the assumption of ‘no vowels’ was arrived at with Hieroglyphics I would like to withold judgement on things like this with Hebrew.
      I am not sure what you mean about Wales being under English control. That is only since medieval times (Edward I etc.) and the Welsh language has only really been effected in the last couple of hundred years. Lloegr (England) Albyne (Scotland) and Cymru (Wales) were 3 related nations with a high King chosen to represent all 3 in times of crisis.
      I have a found a whole load of evidence of Welsh/Assyrian words in English and particularly place names – such as London and its boroughs.
      I will be posting this soon.

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